Colombian National Land Agency formalizes fourth expansion of the Kogui-Malayo-Arhuaco Indigenous Reserve 

The KMA reserve is inhabited by three of the four peoples of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta: the Wiwa people (Malayo or Arzario), Kággaba (Kogui) and Ikᵾ (Arhuaco), with jurisdiction in the departments of Magdalena, Cesar and La Guajira. 3,575 indigenous families benefit from the 213 new hectares, which are allocated to cultural and environmental protection and recovery between the upper and lower areas of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, increasing the area of ​​the reserve to just over 407,839 hectares. 

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Breeding bees to combat deforestation in Caquetá

April 8, 2022, by María Paula Lizarazo, original article published in El Espectador In 2020, in Colombia, the department of Caquetá was the second most deforested, a problem generated by extensive cattle ranching and the production of crops for illicit use. The following shows how some families in the region are changing their economy, while…

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A new healthcare model that seeks consensus among the indigenous peoples of Putumayo

El Espectador / December 17, 2021 In Putumayo, five SISPIs (Indigenous Intercultural Healthcare Systems) are being developed with indigenous communities. This project generates healthcare models that respond to the needs of the communities themselves; however, the process of dialogue with the institutions can be complex. Through December 16, 2021, 2,109 indigenous people had died in…

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Going at Nature’s Pace: The Story of ASOMI

With the occasion of ACT’s 25th anniversary, Maria del Rosario Chicunque—Charito, the formidable leader that some of you have met—and I want to share the wonderful, glorious, painful, and ultimately extraordinary path that led to the creation of ASOMI, the Association of Indigenous Women, and their private reserve in Colombia. ASOMI’s headquarters is aptly called La Chagra de la Vida, or the Garden of Life. As with all gardens, it nourishes us with blessings of food, beauty, and joy, but it needs proactive tending and weeding in return—never-ending tasks that can give us scrapes, blisters, and scars.

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Cómo proteger al Jaguar es fundamental para cuidar la Amazonía

Amazon Conservation Team (ACT), junto con la Universidad del Amazonía, continúan en su proyecto “Vive y convive”, en el que buscan defender a los animales carnívoros en el departamento del Caquetá, en Colombia, que tiene la mayor tasa de deforestación del país. Esta iniciativa busca busca vincular a las comunidades campesinas de la zona en la defensa, no sólo del jaguar, sino de cientos de especies de fauna y flora que habitan este departamento, que es la puerta a la Amazonía colombiana.

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