Colombian Government Approves Groundbreaking Community-Led National Public Policy for the Protection of Isolated Indigenous Groups

 

 

On July 17, 2018, the Colombian government approved a landmark national public policy for the protection of isolated indigenous groups. The policy was developed in a collaboration led by the Colombian Ministry of the Interior with the participation of governmental entities and local and regional indigenous organizations, supported by technical and legal assistance from the nonprofit Amazon Conservation Team (ACT).  

Learn more about this accomplishment here

 

Colombian Government Signs Decree Recognizing the Ancestral Territory of the Indigenous Communities of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta

 


 

On August 6, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos signed a decree that recognizes the ancestral territory of the indigenous communities of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta (SNSM), as defined by the sacred sites of the Linea Negra (Black Line), a ring of sacred sites around the base of the SNSM that forms the boundary of the ancestral territory of the region’s four indigenous groups: Kogui, Arhuaco, Wiwa, and Kankumano.

Learn more about this massive achievement here

 

ACT Field Notes

By: Wilmar Bahamón, ACT Middle Caquetá River Regional Coordinator
Date: Monday, March 20, 2017
On the banks of the Caquetá River, in Colombia, lives Elías García Ruíz, a member of the Murui Muina indigenous group who collects and cultivates native seeds such as that of the cacay tree (Caryodendron orinocense), which is disappearing from their territory because of selective logging of trees of high commercial value and an alarming advance of deforestation.
By: João Carlos Nunes Batista
Date: Friday, September 30, 2016
The Waurá of the Ulupuene village in the Xingu, Brazil came to us with a problem: their water supply had become contaminated by soybean crop pesticides. These pesticides are carried annually to the rivers of midwestern Brazil, often rendering the water unsuitable for human consumption. The Waurá had one request: clean water drawn from an open deep well with the support of the Amazon Conservation Team.
By: João Carlos Nunes Batista
Date: Thursday, September 15, 2016
An important piece of this effort is allowing Waurá youth to experience sacred sites that, until now, have only existed in their imaginations and the stories of their elders. Because of this effort, we were thrilled when we were given the opportunity for ACT to visit Kamukuaká Cave, one of these sacred sites, with several Waurá villagers from multiple generations.

ACT in the Press

By: Monica Andrea Saavedra Crespo
Publication: El Mundo (September 2016)

Mediante la firma de un convenio entre la Gerencia Indígena de Antioquia de la Gobernación y la Agencia Nacional de Tierras se espera dar solución a las solicitudes de titulación, ampliación y construcción de resguardos indígenas en el departamento.

By: Lucía Franco
Publication: vice.com (September 2016)
Roberto Franco ––un politólogo de la Universidad de los Andes que trabajaba como antropólogo y que dedicó su vida a la preservación del medio ambiente, a las comunidades indígenas aisladas, a los campesinos, a causas no muy valoradas–– se subió el 6 de septiembre de 2014 a una avioneta en Araracuara, un pueblo que queda en el Caquetá, luego de pasar la mañana recogiéndole flores de Inirida a Patricia Vargas, su mujer.
By: James Perla
Publication: Living Planet (August 2016)

Despite conservation efforts, swathes of Brazil's Amazon forest are still lost to deforestation. Small-scale illegal logging can be difficult to monitor, even with satellite-imaging technology. Now, one indigenous tribe is looking to GPS mapping on smartphones to protect their forest.