Colombian Government Approves Groundbreaking Community-Led National Public Policy for the Protection of Isolated Indigenous Groups

 

 

On July 17, 2018, the Colombian government approved a landmark national public policy for the protection of isolated indigenous groups. The policy was developed in a collaboration led by the Colombian Ministry of the Interior with the participation of governmental entities and local and regional indigenous organizations, supported by technical and legal assistance from the nonprofit Amazon Conservation Team (ACT).  

Learn more about this accomplishment here

 

Colombian Government Signs Decree Recognizing the Ancestral Territory of the Indigenous Communities of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta

 


 

On August 6, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos signed a decree that recognizes the ancestral territory of the indigenous communities of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta (SNSM), as defined by the sacred sites of the Linea Negra (Black Line), a ring of sacred sites around the base of the SNSM that forms the boundary of the ancestral territory of the region’s four indigenous groups: Kogui, Arhuaco, Wiwa, and Kankumano.

Learn more about this massive achievement here

 

ACT Field Notes

By: Liliana Madrigal
Date: Saturday, March 31, 2018

"...This magical land of water and rainforests is a giant water factory, much threatened by reckless development which is poorly planned and badly executed. The indigenous people who make their home have cautioned about deforestation, against building a road that caused enormous damage, resulting in landslides that killed well over a thousand people. Despite repeated warnings that were ignored by “experts,”  on April 1, 2017, a disastrous avalanche destroyed much of the village Mocoa taking with it hundreds of lives mostly children and displacing thousands of families..."

By: Antonio Peluso
Date: Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Oral Histories in a Waurá Community: In the village of Ulupuene, which partners with ACT, two elders and community leaders passed away: the regional “keeper of songs and dances,” Yakuana, who took with him a vast wealth of knowledge about Waurá cultural practices; and most recently, Aluakumá (“Big Bat”), a village elder, shaman, and healer. Both men were revered, and their kin expressed that they had lost more than just a loved one—they had lost an unrecoverable repository of cultural knowledge.

By: ACT-Suriname
Date: Thursday, April 13, 2017
Earlier this year, a completed series of Junior Park Ranger guides was presented during a special event in at the Tori Oso cultural center in Suriname’s capital city of Paramaribo. The purpose of the series is to enhance the awareness of both indigenous and non-indigenous students regarding Suriname’s extraordinary natural richness.

ACT in the Press

By:
Publication: Waterkant (December 2016)

The preliminary results of the two-year project "Capacity building of strategic groups for the sustainable use of natural resources and biodiversity conservation in Trio and Wayana living areas" were presented on Tuesday during a workshop at the Courtyard Marriott hotel in Paramaribo, Suriname.

By: Mike Gaworecki
Publication: Mongabay (December 2016)

Richard Evans Schultes is often referred to as “the father of ethnobotany,” a field of study that focuses on indigenous cultures and their use of plants. A new online tool lets anyone explore the Amazon rainforest along with him.

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Publication: Revista Arcadia (November 2016)

En 1941, Richard Evan Schultes realizó su primer viaje a la Amazonía colombiana como investigador asociado de la Universidad de Harvard. Tras sus peregrinaciones alertó a la comunidad internacional de la destrucción de la selva amazónica y el exterminio de las comunidades indígenas de la región.