Colombian Government Approves Groundbreaking Community-Led National Public Policy for the Protection of Isolated Indigenous Groups

 

 

On July 17, 2018, the Colombian government approved a landmark national public policy for the protection of isolated indigenous groups. The policy was developed in a collaboration led by the Colombian Ministry of the Interior with the participation of governmental entities and local and regional indigenous organizations, supported by technical and legal assistance from the nonprofit Amazon Conservation Team (ACT).  

Learn more about this accomplishment here

 

Colombian Government Signs Decree Recognizing the Ancestral Territory of the Indigenous Communities of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta

 


 

On August 6, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos signed a decree that recognizes the ancestral territory of the indigenous communities of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta (SNSM), as defined by the sacred sites of the Linea Negra (Black Line), a ring of sacred sites around the base of the SNSM that forms the boundary of the ancestral territory of the region’s four indigenous groups: Kogui, Arhuaco, Wiwa, and Kankumano.

Learn more about this massive achievement here

 

ACT Field Notes

By: Helena Calle, El Espectador
Date: Tuesday, April 10, 2018

After waiting 27 years, the indigenous governments of non-municipalized areas of the Amazon finally will be able to manage the money from their national government transfers without intermediaries.
In Leticia, the Presidency, the Ministries of the Interior, Finance and Agriculture, DANE (the Colombian national statistics agency and the Colombian National Planning Department recognized the governments of 36 indigenous reserves that occupy 26 million hectares of practically intact territory and that had existed in a state of legal limbo with respect to territorial zoning that prevented them, in effect, from governing what is theirs by law.

By: El Espectador
Date: Thursday, April 5, 2018

Colombia’s Supreme Court issued a historic ruling combating climate change in Latin America. According to the decision, the Amazon region is now subject to rights, similar to those assigned to the Atrato River, and the Presidency and regional entities must act urgently to protect it from deforestation.

By: Amazon Conservation Team
Date: Tuesday, April 3, 2018
Imagine that you live in a rainforest many hours from the nearest city. You are very poor, and life is precarious. A parade of soldiers, drug dealers, gangsters, and fortune hunters comes through the village from time to time. They take what they want. You can’t stop them, and no one comes to help you. One day, a man from the government comes and hands you the keys to your land, and says, “Here’s the forest, here’s the river, here are the animals, the plants, the fruits, the fish, the birds, everything on it - it’s yours. It’s now your job to protect it and manage it. That’s what you wanted, right? Good luck!”

ACT in the Press

By: Rick Kearns
Publication: Indian Country Today (January 2017)
Kichwa activists in Ecuador have a new tool for showing the oil-related theft of their territory: an interactive digital story map with details of how the land has been stolen — sold mostly to oil companies— and is still dangerous because of leftover explosives.
By: Alex McAnarney
Publication: El Pais (December 2016)
Gracias a la utilización de mapas disponibles aquí—, la Corte IDH pudo ver con claridad el impacto provocado por la actitud pasiva del Estado a la hora de retirar la pentolita, como la sentencia así indica, y las nuevas concesiones que afectarán a Sarayaku.
By:
Publication: De Ware Tijd (December 2016)
Over the past two years, 25 “Amazon Conservation Rangers” of the Trio and Wayana indigenous communities of Suriname have been trained in sustainable management of the forest as a natural resource; the training has been conducted by the Amazon Conservation Team (ACT) with partners.