ACT News

ACT-Suriname Begins Honey Harvesting Project

Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2015

Bruce Hoffman, Manager for Field Projects of ACT Suriname, is working with the indigenous community of Kwamalasamutu on a project to raise and keep stingless forest bees (Meliponidae) and harvest their honey. This non-timber forest product is a potentially valuable source of sustainable income, and is both tasty and medicinal.

Participatory Mapping Work Begins With the Matawaai

Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2015

In February, Rudo Kemper (Amazon Conservation Team), Niradj Hanoeman (ADEK University student), and Keeng Koemoe (an indigenous cartographer from Kwamalasamutu) traveled to the upper Saramacca river in Suriname for one month to commence a two-year participatory mapping project with the Matawaai maroon people.

Now available: limited edition Kogi tote bag created exclusively for ACT

Posted on Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Donate $500 today to receive a limited edition tote bag created exclusively for ACT. This tote, illustrated and designed by award-winning author and illustrator Janell Cannon, features an image of Kogi Mamo Shibulata. Cannon collaborated with the Kogi people on the drawing, which illustrates environmental dilemmas that challenge the Kogi, as well as the entire world.

Joint Project between ACT and the University of Utrecht Commences

Posted on Monday, March 2, 2015

This year, ACT and the University of Utrecht will commence a joint project designed to strengthen sustainable management to protect resources and biodiversity in Trio and Wayana territory. The priority areas will be defined through careful discussion with local indigenous communities. The project will run for two years and has a budget of 215,000 euros.

Shamans and Apprentices Gathering in Kwamalasamutu

Posted on Monday, February 16, 2015

In January, shamans from various villages across Suriname’s rainforest interior partook in a two-day evaluation of ACT Suriname’s Shamans and Apprentices Program. In addition to the presence of indigenous shamans, Ramon Awenkina—a maroon traditional healer from Gonini Mofo who specializes in bone-setting—joined the meeting.

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