By: Camila Tovar
Publication: ¡Pacifista! (December 2015)
Recently, a comprehensive indigenous public policy was officially signed by the government of Colombia’s Caquetá region. The policy—drafted by seven indigenous groups with technical assistance from ACT—will, for the first time, provide a platform for the indigenous communities to have a say in Caquetá’s future.
By: Camila Tovar
Publication: ¡Pacifista! (December 2015)
In the past several years, the indigenous peoples of the Colombian department of Caquetá have taken enormous steps forward in asserting their rights, creating a representative body and crafting a recently ratified indigenous public policy for the region. ACT guided and assisted the communities through these processes.
By: Mark J. Plotkin
Publication: Americas Quarterly (November 2015)

The U.S. writer H.L. Mencken famously remarked, “There is always a well-known solution to every human problem — neat, plausible and wrong.” The question of how to protect the Amazon’s isolated tribes certainly falls under this principle.

By: Roger L. Martin & Sally R. Osberg
Publication: Harvard Business Review (April 2015)

The Amazon Conservation Team is mentioned in this Harvard Business Review article "Two Keys to Sustainable Social Enterprise" by The Skoll Foundation President & CEO Sally Osberg and strategy guru Roger Martin.

By: Jeremy Hance
Publication: (March 2015)

Earlier this month, National Geographic made big news: the discovery of what it called a "lost city" below the thick jungles of Honduras. While the coverage has led to scientists crying sensationalism, it also resulted this week in a commitment of protection by the Honduras President, Juan Orlando Hernández, for a long-neglected portion of the country.

By: Douglas Preston
Publication: National Geographic (March 2015)

Mark Plotkin (ACT) accompanied a team of scientists and filmmakers led by Steve Elkins and Bill Benenson to a remote portion of the Honduran rainforest believed to harbor the ruins of an ancient city. The team found several archaeological sites of great promise. Since the expedition, the president of Honduras has issued a declaration protecting the area.

By: Megan Taylor Morrison (ACT) & Monika Wnuk
Publication: Huffington Post (August 2014)

In Sibundoy, the ancestral territory of the Kamentsa and Inga indigenous people, both the elders and lands that sustain traditional knowledge are disappearing. To keep pace with climate change, globalization and the region's mining development, local groups are banding together to record this information before it disappears.